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10th Annual ETHICS in Professional Practice Conference

August 5 @ 8:30 am - 5:00 pm

10th Annual ETHICS in Professional Practice Conference

Thank you for attending our 10th Annual ETHICS in Professional Practice Conference!

IMPORTANT POST-CONFERENCE CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION:

For BOTH In-Person and Virtual attendance, we need to verify your attendance.

Each presentation had three (3) unique codes. You were instructed to capture the codes. You now need to complete an electronic evaluation and pass a code submission quiz (Google Form). You need to get all codes correct for all six (6) presentations/panel to earn your Certificate. No partial credit is offered.

Presentation recordings will be available for 14 days post-conference. Recording links are scheduled to be emailed by Tuesday, August 9. The deadline for completing the online evaluation and code quiz is Tuesday, August 23. (If you are seeking Psychology CE Credits through home-study of recordings, the process is through Amego Prepare. Contact Dr. Weinberg at MWeinberg@amegoinc.org)

The Cambridge Center will process Certificates in two batches. One the week following the conference for those completing the process without home-study and one after Tuesday, August 23, the deadline for home-study through recordings.

Start the process with your evaluation of our conference:

https://forms.gle/iTyo7VSUdNPVCLWP8

CHECK YOUR SCORE after completing the code quiz submission form. If you did not get all 6 correct, you may edit your response. You need to get all six presentation codes correct to earn your continuing education certificate.

Download PDF with visual of the process

DEADLINE: Tuesday, August 23, 2022 Midnight (EST)

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A one day conference featuring leaders in the fields of Psychology, Business, Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis offered both for in-person attendance or virtually with recordings available for 14 days post-conference. (9:00 am Start – 5:15 pm Finish – See Schedule)

Of benefit to Behavior Analysts, Psychologists, Speech-Language Pathologists, Teachers, Special Education Providers, School Administrators, Students and Parents & Caregivers.

Schedule

Presenter Bios & Abstracts

 

Invited Presenters

Patrick C. Friman, PhD, ABPP: No Such Thing as a Bad Boy: The Circumstances View of Problem Behavior

Patrick C. Friman, PhD, ABPP
Director
Boys Town Center for Behavioral Health

No Such Thing as a Bad Boy:  The Circumstances View of Problem Behavior

Abstract:

From the beginning of recorded time human beings have assigned blame to persons who misbehave. The first prominent person to make an alternative case was Father Edward J. Flanagan, the founder of Boys Town, who proclaimed there was “no such thing as a bad boy, only bad environment, bad modeling, and bad teaching”  in other words, bad circumstances. This paper will refer to this perspective as the Circumstances View of problem behavior and anchor it as the foundational idea for the field of behavior analysis. This talk will discuss the origins of the Circumstances View, the benefits that result from its adoption, reasons why its adoption is not more widespread, and suggestions for disseminating it more widely. Although this talk is not specifically focused on ethics, it will include ethics relevant points. For example, it will argue that superior ethical outcomes can be obtained by using prescriptions (i.e., what to do) rather than proscriptions (i.e., what not to do).

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the similarities between the philosophies of father Edward J Flanagan and BF Skinner.
  • Describe at least three ways the circumstantial view of behavior improves difficult situations.
  • Describe at least three reasons why these circumstances view of behavior is not more widely used.
Presenter Bio:

Dr. Patrick C. ​​F​riman received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. He is the current Vice ​President of ​Outpatient Behavioral Health Services and a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Nebraska School of Medicine.

He was formerly on the faculties of Johns Hopkins, University of Pennsylvania, and Creighton Schools of Medicine. He was also formerly the Director of the Clinical Psychology Program at University of Nevada as well as the Associate Chairman of the Department of Psychology.

Dr. Friman is the former Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and former President of the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He is also on the editorial boards of eight peer reviewed journals. He has published more than 180 scientific articles and chapters and three books.

The primary focus of his scientific and clinical work in is in the area of Behavioral Pediatrics and Behavioral Medicine. Dr. Friman’s work in behavioral pediatrics has concentrated on the gap between primary medical care for ​children on one side, and referral-based clinical child psychological and psychiatric care, on the other.

He also specializes in consultation regarding workplace issues such as motivation, dealing with difficult people, change, and pathways to success. As an example of the impact of his work, following a publication on child sleep problems, the American Medical Association ​invited him to headline a press conference in New York City where he was presented to the press by the Surgeon General of the United States.

Barbara Heidenreich: We Belong Together. How Behavior Analysts and Animal Care Professionals Can Help Each Other Improve Welfare

Barbara Heidenreich
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
Texas A&M University
Veterinary Medicine & Biological Sciences

We Belong Together. How Behavior Analysts and Animal Care Professionals Can Help Each Other Improve Welfare

Abstract:

Contemporary animal training, especially in the zoological community, focuses on improving welfare by teaching animals to cooperate in medical care, to participate in daily care, and by addressing undesired behavior. Training desired responses is also a part of improving welfare of animals involved in conservation education programs, scientific studies, and conservation initiatives. There has been a heavy emphasis on practical application which has often led to excellent mechanics as well as creative applications. This can include exquisite shaping skills, quick fading of prompts, communication with organisms with which there is no shared verbal language, and the development of innovative shaping plans. Animal caregivers also successfully establish behaviors through protective barriers and without physical contact when working with potentially dangerous animals. Additionally, these are all applied with a wide variety of learners (from rabbits to rhinos). However, this has often been accomplished without the benefit of literature review or without input from those with expertise in the field of behavior analysis. Recently, as more collaborations and communications have transpired between behavior analysts and animal care professionals, inspiring developments have occurred in the animal training industry. These include improved interventions to address undesired behaviors, better understanding of behavior-change procedures, clarifications of the learning processes, and introductions to programs (such as the constructional approach) that can lead to improved practices. These are leading to significant changes in the animal training community. Animal trainers’ expertise in practical application and behavior analysts’ scientific rigor are informing each other in inspiring new ways that have the potential to advance welfare for many learners.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify specific behavior change practices implemented by those working with animals that can potentially improve learner welfare.

  • Identify specific resources and/or developments in the field of behavior analysis that can potentially improve learner welfare, especially for those working with animals.

  • Choose at least one practice, resource, and/or development to further study, implement, or disseminate to facilitate the objective of advancing learner welfare.

Presenter Bio:

Barbara Heidenreich is an animal training consultant specializing in exotic animals. She consults worldwide working with zoos, universities, veterinary professionals, and conservation projects. She has worked onsite with over 80 facilities in 27 countries. She is an adjunct instructor at Texas A & M University. She has authored two books and contributed to four veterinary textbooks. She is a co-author of two Fear Free® Avian Certification Courses. Much of her work focuses on training exotic species to cooperate in medical care. She operates the online education program www.AnimalTrainingFundamentals.com. This virtual learning program features award winning courses, tracks to guide professional development, verifiable badges to share and prove course completion, community, and more. Barbara is an advisor for the Animal Training Working Group and the Parrot Taxon Advisory Group for the European Association of Zoos and Aquariums. She has provided her expertise to conservation projects The Kakapo Recovery Program and The Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation. She has a Bachelor of Science in zoology and has begun the journey towards a Master of Science in applied behavior analysis. Her goal is to leave behind a legacy of kindness to animals by sharing her expertise.

You can find her complete credentials at https://animaltrainingfundamentals.com

Cody Morris, PhD, BCBA-D, LBA: Toward an Understanding of Assent with Individuals with Communication Difficulties

Cody Morris, PhD, BCBA-D, LBA
Assistant Professor, Salve Regina University

Toward an Understanding of Assent with Individuals with Communication Difficulties

Abstract:

Seeking and obtaining assent from clients and research participants is an important component of behavior analytic practice and research. However, typical assent procedures primarily rely on spoken and written communication, which may not be feasible for individuals with significant communication difficulties. Thus, practitioners serving individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities who have limited communication abilities may need to utilize alternative methods for seeking assent. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce assent and related concepts, discuss the importance of assent, and propose practical strategies for obtaining assent with clients who cannot assent through traditional means.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe assent and the reason it is important.
  • Describe the critical components of assent.
  • Adapt assent procedures to fit their client’s needs.
Presenter Bio:

Dr. Cody Morris is an Assistant Professor, Graduate Program Director of Behavior Analysis, and Chair of the IRB at Salve Regina University. He earned his doctorate in Psychology: Behavior Analysis at Western Michigan University.

The overarching goal of Cody’s research and clinical focus is improving the practice of behavior analysis. To this end, Cody’s research has two major concentrations. The first and primary concentration is improving assessment and treatment methodologies for severely challenging behavior in applied settings. The second concentration is addressing organizational issues related to the delivery of behavior analysis.

Cody has published works in prominent behavior analytic journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. He has served as a Reviewer for multiple behavior analytic journals and a Guest Associate Editor for Perspectives on Behavior Science and Behavior Analysis in Practice. Currently, Cody is the Director of the Executive Board for the Rhode Island Association for Behavior Analysis and the Executive Producer and Host of Behavior Analysis in Practice- The Podcast.

Kimberly A. Schreck, PhD, BCBA-D: Navigating an Ethical, Behavioral Worldview in Uncharted or Hazardous Waters

Kimberly A. Schreck, PhD. BCBA-D
Professor of Psychology
School of Behavioral Sciences and Education
Penn State Harrisburg

Navigating an Ethical, Behavioral Worldview in Uncharted or Hazardous Waters

Abstract:

Navigating clinical ABA practice can be difficult with ongoing exposure to the variety of non-ABA interventions, marketed and packaged ABA interventions, and newly developed ABA applications. On their clinical journey, behavior analysts may encounter hazardous situations (e.g., requests to use non-evidence based treatments within collaborative situations or surviving attacks against ABA) or unclear and uncharted waters (i.e., possibly appropriate and ethical, but not yet scientifically supported treatments). Navigating these uncharted, and possibly hazardous, waters requires significant ethical knowledge and strategies. This presentation will provide participants with information about (a) how behavior analysts may be struggling within their clinical practices, (b) the obstacles they may encounter resulting in ethical misdirection, (c) ethical guidelines related to the necessity for scientific, evidence-based clinical practice, and (d) navigational strategies to lead them to ethical behavior.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify trends in behavior analysts’ use of evidence-based and non-evidence based treatments and obstacles to ethical behavior.
  • Identify the ethical guidelines related to using non-evidence and evidence-based treatments in behavior analysis practice.
  • Provide strategies for navigating these uncharted and hazardous waters.
Presenter Bio:

Dr. Kimberly Anne Schreck is a Professor of Psychology at Penn State Harrisburg.  She studied Psychology at Capital University in Bexley, OH, and earned her doctorate at The Ohio State University – specializing in intellectual and developmental disabilities. Dr. Schreck is a licensed Psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral Level.  After completion of her doctorate, Dr. Schreck held a Pediatric Psychology Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.   While there, she specialized in assessment and treatment of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities and early intensive behavioral intervention in autism.

Dr. Schreck started as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Penn State Harrisburg in 1999.  In her first two years at Penn State, Dr. Schreck co-created the Applied Behavior Analysis Master’s degree at Penn State Harrisburg and served as the Professor in Charge of the program for approximately 13 years.  She also served as the first Chair of the Social Science and Psychology Division at Penn State Harrisburg.

Dr. Schreck’s clinical and research interests include ethical practices and evidence-based treatment, autism (e.g., feeding and sleep), intellectual and developmental disabilities (e.g., MPS-IIIA), interventions for skill acquisition, and children’s behavior issues.

Dr. Schreck has become increasingly interested in studying why people choose to use non-scientifically supported treatments. She and her students have studied influences on treatment choice such as media, professional recommendations, and colleague persuasion that may convince parents and professionals to use these treatments. Dr. Schreck has published over 30 articles, reviews, and portions of books and given 100s of presentations in the areas of her research interests. While serving on several editorial review boards and as a guest reviewer for a variety of psychology and behavior analysis journals, Dr. Schreck also served as a past associate editor of Behavioral Interventions.

TV Joe Layng, PhD: Is There Such a “Thing” as Ethics? What a Contingency Analysis Suggests

TV Joe Layng, PhD
Generategy, LLC and
Adjunct Professor and Doctoral Advisor, Endicott College

Is There Such a “Thing” as Ethics? What a Contingency Analysis Suggests (A Joint Presentation with Dr. Andronis)

Abstract:

Much of the discussion of ethics and ethical behavior begins with what may be referred to as ethical values and principles. Philosophers have wrestled with what precisely defines ethics. On one hand ethics has been viewed as the moral principles that govern a person’s behavior, and on another it is the field of study which investigates moral behavior. Students taking ethics classes are often presented with “moral choice,” situations such as the train diversion dilemma. Their arguments as to the course of action and the feelings that emerge become the focus of discussion. We suggest that ethics as a thing, whether as a set of guiding principles or as a field of study, does not exist. This is particularly true for arguments that ethics represent absolute good. Even so, the attempt to act ethically lies at the base of every profession. As Wittgenstein said, “Ethics so far as it springs from the desire to say something about the ultimate meaning of life, the absolute good, the absolute valuable, can be no science. What it says does not add to our knowledge in any sense. But it is a document of a tendency in the human mind which I personally cannot help respecting deeply and I would not for my life ridicule it.” We propose that instead of describing what is or is not ethical, we advocate examining the consequential contingencies responsible for creating and following codes of conduct, their change over time, and how conflicting contingencies can result in what might be described as conflicting ethical conduct.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role absolute goodness plays is in guiding ethical behavior.
  • Describe how consequential contingencies determine ethical guidelines and the implications of such guidance.

  • Distinguish between apparent and genuine assent and the implications for analyzing the contingencies governing professional conduct.

Presenter Bio:

T. V. Joe Layng is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and was the 2020 recipient of the APA: Division 25 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award. Joe has over 50 years of experience in the experimental and applied analysis of behavior with a particular focus on the design of teaching/learning environments. He earned a Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences (biopsychology) at the University of Chicago. At Chicago, working with pigeons, he investigated animal models of psychopathology, specifically the recurrence of pathological patterns (head-banging) as a function of normal behavioral processes. Also working with pigeons, Joe collaborated with Paul Andronis and Israel Goldiamond on investigating the production of untrained recombinant, complex symbolic repertoires in pigeons from simpler behavioral components, a process they described as contingency adduction. Joe has extensive clinical behavior analysis experience with a focus on ambulatory schizophrenia, especially the systemic as well as topical treatment of delusional speech and hallucinatory behavior. In 1984 he founded Enabling Technologies, a software firm which was one of the first to use gamification to teach business software, as well as an array of business products and advanced 3D modeling software. In the 1990s, Joe was Director of Academic Support and then Dean at Malcolm X College in Chicago where he founded the award winning Personalized Curriculum Institute. In 1999, he co-founded Headsprout where Joe led the scientific team that developed the technology that formed the basis of the company’s patented Early Reading and Reading Comprehension online reading programs used by millions of children, for which he was the chief architect. Joe has spent the last several years mentoring students, and interested investigators and practitioners in nonlinear contingency analysis. He has published over 50 articles or chapters, a range of software applications, coauthored a self-instruction book on Signal Detection Theory for behavior analysts and recently coauthored the book Nonlinear Contingency Analysis: Going Beyond Cognition and Behavior in Clinical Practice. Joe is currently a partner in Generategy, LLC.

Paul T. Andronis, PhD: Is There Such a “Thing” as Ethics? What a Contingency Analysis Suggests

Paul T. Andronis, PhD
Emeritus Professor
Department of Psychological Science
Northern Michigan University

Is There Such a “Thing” as Ethics? What a Contingency Analysis Suggests (A Joint Presentation with Dr. Layng)

Abstract:

Much of the discussion of ethics and ethical behavior begins with what may be referred to as ethical values and principles. Philosophers have wrestled with what precisely defines ethics. On one hand ethics has been viewed as the moral principles that govern a person’s behavior, and on another it is the field of study which investigates moral behavior. Students taking ethics classes are often presented with “moral choice,” situations such as the train diversion dilemma. Their arguments as to the course of action and the feelings that emerge become the focus of discussion. We suggest that ethics as a thing, whether as a set of guiding principles or as a field of study, does not exist. This is particularly true for arguments that ethics represent absolute good. Even so, the attempt to act ethically lies at the base of every profession. As Wittgenstein said, “Ethics so far as it springs from the desire to say something about the ultimate meaning of life, the absolute good, the absolute valuable, can be no science. What it says does not add to our knowledge in any sense. But it is a document of a tendency in the human mind which I personally cannot help respecting deeply and I would not for my life ridicule it.” We propose that instead of describing what is or is not ethical, we advocate examining the consequential contingencies responsible for creating and following codes of conduct, their change over time, and how conflicting contingencies can result in what might be described as conflicting ethical conduct.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role absolute goodness plays is in guiding ethical behavior.

  • Describe how consequential contingencies determine ethical guidelines and the implications of such guidance.

  • Distinguish between apparent and genuine assent and the implications for analyzing the contingencies governing professional conduct. 

Presenter Bio:

Paul Andronis earned the B.S. and M.S. in Zoology at Western Illinois University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Biopsychology at The University of Chicago under the tutelage of Prof. Israel Goldiamond.  At Chicago, he and Joe Layng collaborated on several projects, including: experimental work with pigeons on contingencies of social behavior and on control of self-injurious behavior by positive reinforcement contingencies; a training program in behavior analysis for mental health workers at a State of Illinois mental health facility; and as Systems Analysts at the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago, where they and a team of behavior analysts successfully implemented a hospital-wide computer information system.  Afterwards, he, Joe Layng, and others from Goldiamond’s lab  founded a software company focused mainly on productivity products, featuring advanced control-analysis strategies for user-testing with attention to the critical stimulus control relations involved.  He then completed a three-year USPHS Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Psychiatry at The University of Chicago, and concurrently held part-time appointments as Instructor in behavioral sciences departments at Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University, Roosevelt University, and the Chicago School of Professional Psychology (where he received the Excellence in Teaching Award).  He was subsequently appointed full-time as Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Chicago Osteopathic Medical School where he established a new behavioral medicine program and trained psychiatry residents and interns in applications of behavioral contingency analysis to clinical problems.  Soon thereafter, he was recruited back to the faculty of The University of Chicago, with primary appointment as Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in Behavioral Medicine (Department of Psychiatry), and joint appointments in the Department of Medicine (Section on Gastroenterology), in the Committee on Biopsychology (Department of Behavioral Sciences), and in the College.  In Fall 1990, he was hired by the Department of Psychology at Northern Michigan University (NMU), with primary responsibilities for teaching courses in experimental and applied behavior analysis, training students in behavioral research and intervention, and coordinating the Behavior Analysis concentration area, for which after ten years he was awarded the NMU Distinguished Professor Award.  In addition to his teaching, academic work, and running his basic research (human, pigeon, and cockroach) laboratories at NMU, he was also sought out for consultation by outside programs delivering treatment for children with autism, adults with cognitive deficits and mental illnesses, and by Headsprout, Inc., a large software company specializing in online instructional programs.  After the sale of Headsprout, Joe Layng and he then partnered in a new educational software company, Generategy LLC, and recently coauthored a book (with Awab Abdel-Jalil and Trent Codd) on nonlinear contingency analysis and Goldiamond’s Contructional Approach in clinical settings.  Professor Andronis retired last June after thirty years at NMU, and was granted status as Professor Emeritus of Psychological Sciences.

Patricia Wright, PhD, MPH: Working Upstream

Patricia Wright, PhD, MPH
Executive Director
Proof Positive: Autism Wellbeing Alliance

Working Upstream

Abstract:

The intent of applied behavior analysis (ABA) is to improve the human condition. There is an increasing call for ABA to expand its sphere of influence and address issues of societal importance. Working “upstream,” addressing social determinants of health (SDoH), the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and play), can answer this call. SDoH are frequently used as a framework to improve overall health and wellbeing at a global, national, and local level. Influencers such as the World Health Organization and Healthy People 2030 organize their interventions within the SDoH framework. This session will discuss SDoH and encourage the use of upstream interventions to address health disparities prevalent in marginalized populations including autistic individuals.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recall categories of social determinants of health.
  • Compare social determinants of health and the practice of applied behavior analysis and determine intersections.
  • Discuss the application of upstream intervention to the practice in applied behavior analysis.
Presenter Bio:

Dr. Patricia Wright’s commitment to ensuring all individuals with autism have access to effective services and supports has guided her work for more than 35 years, from her earliest responsibilities as a special educator, to state and national-level program management. Specific examples of her advocacy include the management in the design of a statewide system of support for children with autism for the state of Hawaii, several years as the National Director of Autism Services for Easter Seals, her industry positions leveraging technology, and her current role at Proof Positive, spreading the science and skills of happiness.

Dr. Wright has held advisory roles for a number of professional associations and advocacy groups, including the Organization for Autism Research’s Scientific Council, the Executive Committee for the Friends of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Board of Directors for the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts and the Autism Society Panel of Professional Advisors. She has been asked to provide expert testimony at Congressional Hearings and is a frequent contributor in the media, raising awareness of effective intervention for those living with disabilities.

Dr. Wright completed her PhD and Master of Public Health from the University of Hawaii. Her research focuses on the delivery of evidence-based interventions in community-based settings and healthcare access for people with disabilities.

Continuing Education Opportunities

Continuing Education opportunities:

BACB® Learning CEs and Psychology CE Credits (Includes Licensed psychologists, school psychologists, and EdDs/educational psychologists)

This is a hybrid in-person and virtual conference. Recordings will be available for 14 days. (For those seeking Psychology CE Credits, there is an additional testing process to be completed for asynchronous/home-study completion.)

BACB®  ETHICS Learning CEUs (6.0): The Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies is an approved Type 2 CE Provider by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (BACB®) and is authorized to offer 6.0 CE units for this conference. Continuing Education Provider No.: OP-04-0058

Attendees must complete all six presentations in-person, virtually or through recordings available for 14 days post-conference for asynchronous home-study to earn CEs. (Partial credit will not be issued.) An evaluation and code quiz with a 100% score needs to be completed for issuance of continuing education.

APA Approved Sponsor

APA Approved Sponsor

Psychology CE Credits (6.0 )*: Amego Prepare is a co-sponsor of this conference for Continuing Education Credits for Psychologists. Amego Prepare is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Amego Prepare maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

In case of a complaint, about Psychology CE Credits, contact Amergo Prepare directly through Dr. Michael Weinberg at MWeinberg@amegoinc.org.

Attendees must complete all six presentations in-person, virtually or through home-study* to earn Psychology CE Credits. (Partial credit will not be issued.) An evaluation and code quiz with a 100% score needs to be completed for issuance of continuing education. *If you are completing the conference through recordings for home-study, there is a DIFFERENT process through Amego Prepare for those seeking a certificate for Psychology CE Credits. Contact Michael Weinberg at MWeinberg@amegoinc.org.

IMPORTANT NOTES:

For BOTH In-Person and Virtual attendance, we need to verify your attendance.

Each presentation will have three (3) unique codes. You need to capture the codes. At the end of the conference, you will need to complete an electronic evaluation and pass a code submission quiz (Google Form). You need to get all codes correct for all six (6) presentations/panel to earn your Certificate. No partial credit is offered.

The link to start the process is below. It will also be announced for in-person attendees and an email will be sent to all conference attendees at 4:30 pm (EST) near the end of the conference with the link and instructions. Presentation recordings will be available for 14 days post-conference. Recording links are scheduled to be emailed by Tuesday, August 9. The deadline for completing the online evaluation and code quiz is Tuesday, August 23. (If you are seeking Psychology CE Credits through home-study of recordings, the process is through Amego Prepare. Contact Dr. Weinberg at MWeinberg@amegoinc.org)

The Cambridge Center will process Certificates in two batches. One immediately following the conference for those completing the process without home-study and one after Tuesday, August 23, the deadline for home-study through recordings.

Start the process with your evaluation of our conference:

https://forms.gle/iTyo7VSUdNPVCLWP8

 

It is attendee’s responsibility to check with their State and Professional organization to confirm all CE offerings.

Location - Endicott College, Beverly, MA and online

This is a hybrid event with a smaller in-person gathering or a virtual attendance offering. Our in-person event will be held on the beautiful campus of Endicott College in Beverly, Massachusetts.

For In-Person:

Event Venue: Cleary Lecture Hall, Endicott College’s main lecture hall located in the Hempstead Commons Building at the center of campus. Interactive Campus Map

The Parking Garage is open this year! It is located near the Hempstead Commons Building & Wax Academic Center. For parking anywhere on campus, you need to download and print out the parking permit for your vehicle.

Enter the Endicott College main entrance and follow the road up the Hill. There will be a detail officer and signs to direct you.

COVID Related

Endicott College is operating in accordance with state and local government requirements and is abiding by CDC recommendations regarding COVID-19.

Masks are now optional on the Endicott campus regardless of vaccination status. Individuals are encouraged to do what they are comfortable with in regard to mask wearing and are asked to respect others.

For virtual attendance:

The Zoom meeting link and access information was from behavior.org@gmail.com the week of the conference. And for those who didn’t open, it was re-mailed from pavlik@behavior.org (Rebekah Pavlik). IF you did not receive, email pavlik@behavior.org.

 

 

 

 

Thank You to Our Gold Sponsors

Thank you to our Gold Sponsor Butterfly Effects
Thank You to Our GOLD Sponsor MELMARK

Thank You to Our Silver Sponsors

Behavior Development Solutions
Bierman Autism Centers
Journeys Autism Center
Pyramid Educational Consultants (PECS)
TACT

Invited Speakers:

Speakers are subject to change.

Details

Date:
August 5
Time:
8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Event Categories:
,

Organizer

Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies
Phone:
(978) 369-2227

Venue

Endicott College Campus, Beverly, Massachusetts
376 Hale Street
Beverly, MA 01915 United States
+ Google Map